Tag Archive: Gluten Free

  1. Concord Grape & Mint Sorbet

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    Happyolks | Concord Grape & Mint Sorbet

    I’ve had a word document open on my desktop for the past month. The ticker at the footer reads 6,201 words. Oy. Everyday for the past week I’ve tried to sit down, stand up, walk around with the laptop getting things sorted out. Music, no music. Pants, no pants. Wine, more wine. You know when you throw out your back and you find yourself inventing new yoga poses to get that darn thing to pop back into place? Yeah, that’s how I feel about writing right now. Just. Can’t. Quite. Get. There. The stuff sorta hurts to get out and then ends up looking like a mess on the page. 

    Then I sat down with a friend. She’s a writer. She gets it. She also has a 13 month old daughter and pumps out about twice the content I can in a week and I think to myself: Jesus, Kels, SHE HAS TO TAKE CARE OF ANOTHER LIVING CREATURE AND YOU CAN’T GET YOUR SHIT TOGETHER. Anyway, we had this great chat about vulnerability, where it fits with the business of writing (and sharing that writing online) and how the word and concept makes us recoil a bit when we hear it tossed around so casually over coffee and cocktails. She said this, which I love: some secrets are worth keeping. Sometimes none of the words and thoughts and feelings we wrestle with need to see the light, and that’s okay. It takes guts to get vulnerable, i.e. share parts of ourselves that we fear will result in rejection. But guts for the sake of guts feels totally… disingenuous? It shows security, confidence to pump the brakes a bit, and decide, on our own terms, how and when and for whom we’ll strip down for. 

    I worry, sometimes, that my generation falsely associates vulnerability with sharing every moment tasted, every hurt suffered, every little nugget of wisdom that comes to us while washing our hair or taking out the trash. I feel like we relinquish a bit of our agency in doing so. We give up sacredness for the rush of affirmation –– I divulge, therefore I exist. We don’t get a chance to ever really feel something in a totally pure state without those feelings being tampered by the onlookers we willingly, or unwillingly, called to table. There is enough of that look-at-me-see-me-feel-my-heart-beat-but-don’t-actually-judge-me-or-tell-me-something-I-don’t-want-to-hear sorta thing on the internet and in the “real” world that we have to deal with. 

    So instead of trying to contort the ever-living crap of that diabolical mess of thoughts, I’m going to bank on what I know for sure: loosening the grip reveals new truths, and that space and distance do help us heal and sort through the things that weigh heavy on our hearts. It’s okay to let some things just be our own to ponder and wrestle.

    Instead! Life update:

    We’re moving. To the mountains. It feels right. We’ve grappled quietly with getting out of dodge leaving Denver since late spring, and upon our return from Bali it felt like all lights were flashing GREEN GREEN GREEN to manifest on that tug for migration. Seattle and Portland, Maine made the shortlist, but we’re not quite ready to say sayonara to these Rocky Mountains yet. We’re under contract on a little place west of Boulder that backs up onto a bit of woods –– we’ll sign and get the keys on Shaun’s 26th birthday. Wish us luck. 

    Happyolks | Concord Grape & Mint SorbetHappyolks | Concord Grape & Mint SorbetHappyolks | Concord Grape & Mint SorbetHappyolks | Concord Grape & Mint Sorbet

    Concord Grape & Mint Sorbet

    I finagled a few shortcuts to this killer recipe from Kimberley Hasselbrink’s recent release, Vibrant Food. After watching the food blog community reproduce the summer chapter online when the book first came out, I felt like I should wait to share this number when the leaves started changing and remind you that the fall, winter, and spring chapters of this book are equally impressive. I had the huge honor of recipe testing for Kimberley as Vibrant Food came together and I’m telling you, she, and these recipes, are total keepers. Oh, and, the recipe for harissa, on page 97, needs to be bottled and sold around the world. It’s the best I’ve ever had.

    You’ll need:

    • 2 lbs fresh Concord grapes, stems removed
    • 12 mint leaves
    • 1/4 cup sugar
    • juice of 1 lime
    • ––

    Remove stems from grapes. Rinse. In the basin of a blender or food processor, combine grapes, mint leaves, sugar, and the juice of 1 lime. Puree the the mixture until all but a few specks of grape skin remain visible. Kimberly suggests straining the mixture through a fine mesh sieve or strainer, but I’m into the pulp. It’s up to you.

    Churn the blended grapes in an ice cream maker for 25-30 minutes, until slightly frozen. The sorbet will still be soft. Pour into a freezer-safe container and freeze for three more hours to solidify.

    Happyolks | Concord Grape & Mint SorbetHappyolks | Concord Grape & Mint SorbetHappyolks | Concord Grape & Mint SorbetHappyolks | Concord Grape & Mint SorbetHappyolks | Concord Grape & Mint Sorbet

  2. Flavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad

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    Flavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.comFlavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.comFlavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.comFlavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.com

    Flavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.comFlavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.comFlavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.comFlavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.com

    Mango Chili Rice Salad

    Inspired by the flavors of Bali, Indonesia.  Images captured in our temporary Penestanan, Ubud home + kitchen. We’re home, now. 

    • 1 cup brown rice
    • 1 mango
    • 1 cup celery leaves (or) cilantro
    • 1 cup mint
    • 1 cup basil
    • 1 cup flat-leaf parsley
    • 1 cup green onion
    • 3 leaves kaffir lime leaves
    • 6-8 shallots
    • 3 stalks fresh lemongrass
    • 2-3 chilies of choice
    • 1/4 cup coconut oil
    • several limes
    • salt to taste
    •   ––

    In a medium saucepan bring 2 cups water and 1/4 teaspoon salt to boiling. Slowly add 1 cup long grain rice and return to a boil. Reduce the heat and cover with a tight-fitting lid. Cook about 45 minutes or until rice is tender and water is absorbed. Remove pan from heat and let stand, covered for 5 minutes. Fluff rice with a fork before serving.

    Segment mango into bite sized pieces. Set aside in a bowl or prep plate. Julienne celery, mint, basil, and parsley or keep leaves whole – however you prefer. For this variation I kept the herbs whole. Set aside. Cut green onion AND chili(es) of choice at a bias, add to prepped herbs and mango that you’ve set aside.

    Chop shallots and fry in a small saucepan over medium heat in coconut oil for 5-10 minutes. While the shallots sizzle, prepare fresh lemon grass stalks. You will need a very sharp knife, as the stalks are quite firm. Remove the lower bulb and shed any tough outer leaves. Slice into thin rounds and pound the pieces with a pestle & mortar until softened and fragrant. Add to the shallots. Cut kaffir lime leaves into thin strips with scissors, add to shallots and lemongrass. Let simmer for another 5 minutes or until slightly browned and fragrant. Add a bit of coconut oil if the mix starts to dry out.

    Toss together cooled rice and the prepped herbs, mango, etc. Pour fried shallot mixture over the salad and toss again. Add salt and juice of several limes as desired.

    Flavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.com Flavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.comFlavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.com Flavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.com Flavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.com Flavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.com Flavors of Bali: Mango Chili Rice Salad from www.happyolks.com

  3. Field Notes

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    Autumn. FINALLY. My bones have ached for this season. I do believe the leaves on the trees that line our street now match the hues of my heart, and for a few brief, palpable moments over the past few days, I’ve been reminded that I belong in this human skin, this temporal world.

    Offline life owns any and all coherent bits of my lexicon right now, so today I give you a film, doughnuts from Ashley’s super fun new cookbook, and a few notes from the field, as follows: 

    (1) Tell people you love them while they can still hear you (2) Get over yourself. Self-consciousness robs us of being fully present to others (3) Pay attention and everyone is the guru — especially the 6 year old boy next door (4) Celebrate the people who keep you company. Thank them, daily, for their grace, patience, and wisdom (5) Beautiful things don’t just happen, you make them happen. Work hard. Keep your chin up (6) We belong to the earth. Lie in the leaves on the ground and pray like hell you’ll learn how to burst and bless and move on like they do (7) Change your toothbrush more often and buy new underwear. It’s the little things (8) “Nobody looks stupid when they’re having fun” – Amy Poehler  (9) Date pits do not go in the garbage disposal (10) Sparklers in place of birthday candles make a mess, but are always a good idea. 

    Gluten-Free Apple Fritter Doughnuts 

    • 1 cup oat flour
    • 1 cup rice flour
    • 2/3 cup cane sugar
    • 6 tbsp almond meal
    • 2 tsp baking powder
    • 2 tsp cinnamon
    • 1 tsp sea salt
    • 4 large eggs
    • 1/2 cup + 4 tbsp buttermilk
    • 1/2 cup apple sauce
    • 4 tbsp coconut oil
    • 3 tsp vanilla
    • 1 cup peeled, diced honeycrisp apples
    • 1 1/2 cup sugar + 2 tsp cinnamon for coating
    • 1/4 cup butter or coconut oil, melted

    Preheat the oven to 350.’ Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl, and mix well. In another bowl, whisk together liquid ingredients and eggs. Pour wet mixture into the dry and stir gently with a wooden spoon until just combined and there are no more flour streaks. Fold in the diced apples gently.

    Spoon batter into standard doughnut molds, before the top of the basin. As you can see in the video, I struggled with this. If they look wonky and overflowing they still turn out good, I promise. Bake for 15-18 minutes until lightly golden brown around the edges. Let cool before tackling the cinnamon sugar coating.

    Ashley’s instructions for the fritter effect are for stoves with a broiler situated at the top of the oven, mine are for a lower oven/drawer-style broiler and instructions are shared accordingly. In an assembly line, place bowl of melted oil/butter in the middle between the cooled rack of donuts and a bowl of cinnamon sugar mixture. Dip tops of baked and cooled doughnuts in the oil/butter for a millisecond, then roll around in the sugar mix. Place on a baking sheet, cast iron pan, or sheet of tin foil beneath the broiler to caramelize the sugar for 2-3 minutes, careful not to burn. Repeat until doughnuts are coated. Serve warm.

    ** Leave a comment with your field notes of late and I’ll pick one winner to receive a copy of Baked Doughnuts for Everyone by October 29, 2013. Winner will be announced on facebook and via email! Cheers!

Let's get in Touch

I wish I could make coffee dates with you all. In the meantime, feel free to drop me a line with questions, comments, concerns, or just to say Hi. I like that. There is nothing more uplifting than an email from a a fresh contact or kindred spirit.

I can be reached through this contact form and at happyolks [at] gmail [dot] com.